Friday, October 31, 2008

Halloween - not just for kids

Boooooooooooooooo... Wooooooooooooo!

Yeah, sorry, that was supposed to be a ghosty noise.

So HAPPY HALLOWEEN everyone! I hope you are all enjoying the festivities that today brings; parties, sweeties, trick or treating, or, like me, sitting in the apartment with the lights off and the tv down low, ignoring all knocks at the door.

Yes, that's right, I'm hiding from the children who are trick or treating tonight - well, I haven't actually had anyone at the door yet, but I'm hiding from any potential children who come looking for treats. It may sound mean, but it's for the kid's own good as I haven't actually bought any bon bons to give them (I aint got no money these days, not even enough to turn the heating up, instead having to wear several layers of wooly jumpers making it very hard to move around in, therefore buying sweets that I won't even get to eat is not high on my list right now.)

Another reason why it's a better idea to ignore the doorbell tonight is because I'm in by myself and I fear that without the help of FP I may not understand what the French children say to me. I haven't really spoken to many French kids before you see, and the ones that I have spoken to used lots of strange words and spoke very quickly, at double the speed of the French adults. It's a very odd feeling when a 6 year old corrects your grammer. Anyway, I felt scared enough around French kids as it was when FP was right next to me, but answering the door to a couple of trick or treaters wearing freaky spiderman masks and devil horns might just be the last straw for my nerves.

Halloween is a fairly new thing here - the French were really late in catching onto that one. It's funny, because halloween is a big part of my childhood, whereas FP has never celebrated this holiday and can't understand what it's all about. For me it was almost as exciting as christmas. Every single year I dressed up in disguise and either went out to a party or visited friend's houses with a plastic Asda bag in hand to collect the sweets and unwelcome apples and monkey nuts (what child ever wanted fruit and nuts in their goody bag?! Unless it was in the form of Cadbury's Fruit and Nut bar, of course).

I don't know if it's the same custom where you are, but in my part of the woods, we didn't just turn up at people's doors looking for treats. No, we had to earn those sweeties with a party piece. Some would tell jokes, others would sing, or recite a poem. I normally did a dance routine, which wasn't exactly the norm, but then, neither was I. When it wasn't a dance routine, I'd tell a good old knock-knock joke. The amount of times the poor adults heard the same 'knock-knock' joke in one halloween night could almost equal the amount of children they saw that evening - my brother would often tell a great knock-knock joke which would then be followed up by me telling exactly the same joke, word for word.

And the costumes! Oh the costumes would have been the best part if it weren't for the sweets! There was one year I dressed up as Santa with black bin bags over my boots to make them appear shiny, and cotton wool on my chin. The same year Zannie dressed up as a bee. Another year I was a gypsy with a home made camel's head stuck on a stick (my mother tried to explain to me that she knew of no gypsy who had a camel but I was going through a camel-loving stage and couldn't be talked out of it) and my brother was Upside Down Man (he wore his trousers on his top half and his sweater on his bottom half). And the ultimate...the year I went to my cousin's halloween party as Elastic Woman. (That one consisted of fake elastic limbs double the length of my own that dragged around on the ground behind le as I walked.)

I may have grown up since those distant days of Elastic Woman but it doesn't mean I am going to stop celebrating Halloween. This is how I celebrated today in the office...

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But it wasn't just me...

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In fact, everyone in the office decided to join in!

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To see the rest of the collection click here.

Have a happy Halloweeeeeen!

6 comments:

Micah D.L. said...

most excellent! I love your costume(s)!!

TD does not do dressing up on Halloween, but rather enjoys seeing what everyone ELSE comes up with. Although, this year, we went to a costume party at the symphony and he dressed up like Don Johnson in Miami Vice. HOT!.

I was Judy Jetson this year and was mistaken for Cindy Lou Who (from The Grinch), Marie Antionette (heh?) and Frenchie from the movie Grease. HILARIOUS!

TD and I will be joining our friends for handing out candy (and tiny bottles of booze for the poor suffering papas that have to walk around endlessly for their children to gather pillowcases full of candy that will likely never get eaten)...woo hoo!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Zhu said...

I didn't know Halloween at all when I was a kid in France. I think it first came in 97...

It's more fun in the USA, it is cultural.

Oh, and I do hide from kids. Man, there are hundreds of them outside!

Lis of the North said...

My colleagues think the Americans invented Hallowe'en. Ancient Celtic festival I'll have you know!
No kids round us this year. We were late in from work and I think Doggy scared them all away.
Ah Princesse, those happy Hallowe'en memories. One year I went as a washing machine. My Dad helped me make that costume. He only gave me one wash cycle - lukewarm.
Looks like you had a good laugh at work. Good excuse to all look silly together! xx

Stavroulix said...

In Greece it's not known as a celebration either, I understand FP's attitude. Here we just know that people celebrate halloween mainly in the US, but in Greece we have 3 weeks of dress-up parties in the Carnival season before Easter, which is a bit like the carnival in Brazil with parades and everything, so we are waiting for that :)

Kimberly said...

What a fascinating take on Halloween from both the Scottish and French point of view! I guess my geocentric point of view didn't even allow me to consider that Halloween and trick-or-treat was a big deal in other parts of the world. Typical American.

Here it's become such a greed fest that the children don't even bother to say Trick-or-Treat, just open up their bags like baby birds waiting to be fed. I gently remind them to say it, and fondly recall the days when my step-father would demand a trick or performance from our local ghouls and princesses. Of course, I also recall the year when we were supposed to take our candy to the hospital to be x-rayed to make sure no pins or razor blades had been hidden inside. Crazy world.

Teff john said...

i like to hide from kids and I was Judy Jetson this year and was mistaken for Cindy Lou Who (from The Grinch), Marie Antionette (heh?) and Frenchie from the movie Grease. TD and I will be joining our friends for handing out candy (and tiny bottles of booze for the poor suffering papas that have to walk around endlessly for their children to gather pillowcases full of candy that will likely never get eaten.
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teff john

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